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How Does Alzheimer’s Disease Progress?

Learning that your aging parent is suffering from Alzheimer’s disease is a life-changing moment for both of you. While there are many steps that you will need to take and decisions to consider during this time, one of the most important things that you can do is simply to keep yourself informed and well-educated about the disease and what your aging parent is truly facing. One of the first questions that you are likely to have is how the disease will progress.

Senior Care in Buffalo MN: The Progression of Alzheimer's Disease

Senior Care in Buffalo MN: The Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

You know that Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive form of dementia, meaning that it will worsen and change over time. Understanding how the disease progresses can help both of you feel less anxious and out of control, and better prepare you for the challenges to come.

One very important thing to keep in mind when it comes to this progression is that there is no one set way that everyone who is living with Alzheimer’s disease will progress through the condition. This is a very personal journey and your senior will have their own experience with it. This means that your aging parent might have some symptoms for quite some time, and then suddenly develop others, or may move quickly through increased challenges and needs.

The progression of Alzheimer’s disease covers three basic stages. These are the early, or mild, middle, or moderate, and advanced, or later-stage. It is vital that you be aware of these stages and what to expect during them so that you can prepare for the caregiver efforts you will need to give them as they progress.

In general the average lifespan for someone who is living with Alzheimer’s disease is between four and eight years after diagnosis. With advancements in treatments, early detection, and healthier lifestyles, though, many people are living much longer. This means that while you should be prepared for your parent to progress relatively quickly, you should also consider the possibility of them living for twenty years or more when planning for the future.

 

If you have recently learned that your aging parent is living with Alzheimer’s disease, or they have been progressing through the stages and their challenges have increased, now may be the ideal time for you to consider starting senior care for them. A senior home care services provider can be with your aging parent on a customized schedule to ensure that they get all of the care, support, and assistance they need to handle their challenges and needs now, and prepare them for their continued progression into the future. As their family caregiver, this can give you tremendous peace of mind and confidence that your senior is getting everything they need both when you are able to be with them and when you are not so they can enjoy the most active, fulfilling, and healthy quality of life possible as they age in place.

If you or someone you know needs senior care in Buffalo, MN, contact Prairie River Home Care. We provide quality and affordable home care services for many fragile or senior members in the communities we serve. Call us at (888) 660-5772 for more information.

 

Source

www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_stages_of_alzheimers.asp

Lori Seeman

Lori Seemann has a background in nurse management, hands-on critical care and business management. Her clinical expertise and knowledge of information systems had been instrumental in ensuring operational consistency in all branch offices. She led efforts that resulted in implementation of a new home care computer system that is utilized for staffing, scheduling, clinical records and billing. Lori continues to seek opportunities to improve caregiver productivity through nurse utilization of a unique point of care laptop computer system.

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